Maps and Diagram

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On this page there are two expositions dealing with different subjects.Pressure Model and Light Source/Shadow model The first, on the left side of the page, concerns a model used to express a problem regarding the effects of air pressure. There it is claimed that if a completely full bowl of water is placed at the bottom of a very deep well and drawn up to the top of a very high minaret located right next to the well, the water in the bowl will overflow. The other concerns a light source and the shadow cast by an opaque body, and comprises drawings which explicate the dimensions and shapes of the body and its shadow. Here it is posited that the light source must be larger than the opaque body, and by demostrating how solar and lunar eclipses would occur in order to produce triangular, rectagular, or hexogonal shadows, the effort is to verify that the heavenly bodies are round by demonstrating that the shadows in solar and lunar eclipses are necessarily circular.

A Map of IranA map of Iran by Kırımî Ahmed comprising the lands ruled by the Safavi Shahs. This map does not have lines of latitude and longitude, and directions are established by means of two projection centers, one located in the Persian Gulf and the other in the Caspian Sea. Even without lines of latitude and longitude, the map is provided with a mathematically-based scale. Distances are measured in terms of the day’s journey, the fersah (approx. 3 miles), the mile, and the hour. Rivers, mountain ranges, great lakes and the borders of countries are drawn in between the 20-40 degree north parallels.

Caspian RegionThe Caspian Region: A map of the Caucasus showing the regions where the Ulunogay, Circassian and Abaza people reside; the lands of Dağıstan, Shirvan, and Gürjistan; and the provinces of Genje, Revan, Kars, Çıldır, Trabzon and Erzerum. Even without lines of latitude and longitude, the map is provided with a mathematically-based scale. Distances are measured in terms of the day’s journey, the fersah (approx. 3 miles), the mile, and the hour. Rivers, mountain ranges, great lakes and the borders of countries are shown in different colors in the area between the 39-48 degree north parallels and 55-69 degree east meridians. The Black Sea is drawn in such a way as to show the sovereignty of the Ottoman State.

Heavenly Bodies according to the geocentric model of PtolemyA diagram showing the order of the heavenly bodies according to the geocentric model of Ptolemy. According to the Ptolemaic model, the earth is imagined to be fixed at the center of the universe and surrounded by concentric spheres. The fixed stars of the Zodiac are found in the spheres of the moon, Mercury, Venus, the sun, Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. Beyond these is the sphere of spheres (the atlas sphere), thought to embrace the entire universe. It was drawn by Jeografî, a pseudonym of İbrahim Müteferrika himself, renowned for establishing the first Ottoman printing press, which published Displaying the World.

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